Living in a constant state of exhaustion can relax your throat and tongue muscles, much like alcohol, and set you up for snoring. Aim for at least seven hours of sleep per night, but preferably closer to eight or nine, to get sounder sleep. You'll want to avoid sleeping pills and sedatives, though, as those can relax the muscles in your throat even more and worsen snoring. Instead, if you have trouble turning in earlier, try one of these science-backed tips for better sleep.

The verdict: Consider it. If your snoring is due to nasal congestion or allergies, and your nasal congestion or allergies are worse in dry air, sleeping with a humidifier might help, says Badr, and it certainly won't hurt. However, he says, "there may be a kernel of truth in a lot of these home remedies, but they're probably not the whole story." Believing you can cure snoring with the switch of a humidifier minimizes the gravity of snoring, rather than encouraging you to bring it to the attention of your physician, he says.
2. Notice the noise: When we listen to noise we tend do so with judgment, thinking about whether it is good or bad. Snoring, typically judged as bad, promotes stress and wakefulness. It can therefore be helpful to describe the sound of the noise objectively as you hear it such as “I can hear a rattle, a snort, a whisper, a wheeze” or “It starts soft and gets loud”. Describing it in this objective and non judgmental way releases you from its emotional grip and increases the chance of actually sleeping.

If you're suffering from a cold or seasonal allergies (which some people suffer from all year long), you're probably congested and experiencing a fair amount of throat and nasal inflammation. This, in turn, can lead to loud mouth breathing and snoring. One super-soothing way to clear out your sinuses and breathe easier is by treating yourself to a facial steam. Right before bed, fill a large bowl with hot water and a few drops of peppermint essential oil. (The menthol in peppermint will help further alleviate congestion.) Drop your head over the steam and breathe in, with a towel behind you to lock in the moisture. Taking a steamy shower can have a similar effect.


For some snoring devices, you do need a doctor’s prescription. Because many of these devices are regulated by the US FDA, they are considered treatment devices. There is concern that many individuals that have more severe health issues, like obstructive sleep apnea, may be undiagnosed, or misdiagnosed, and have complications as a result of no clinician intervention.
Sleeping on your side, losing excess weight, and avoiding alcohol and smoking can help if you are snoring regularly. Anti-snoring devices like nasal strips, chin strips, and mandibular advancement devices can also reduce snoring by allowing you to breathe properly through your nose. Natural remedies such as yogurt, turmeric, and pineapple, as well as saline nasal washes and peppermint steam inhalations, can come in handy if a stuffy nose is making you snore.

You probably didn’t need science to tell you this, but “snoring can affect your quality of sleep as well as your bed partner’s,” says Neil Kline, a sleep physician with the American Sleep Association. If you don’t believe us, take a look at this 2006 study, which found evidence of sleep disruption in children and adolescents who snored, or this 1999 one, which found that people slept an entire hour longer each night after their spouses stopped snoring. This is important because we know that good-quality sleep improves your overall health.
Snoring is sometimes a symptom of obstructive sleep apnea, a more serious form of sleep-disrupted breathing. People with sleep apnea experience periodic interruptions to their breathing during sleep, as the airway closes and temporarily cuts off normal airflow. These interruptions can be occasional, with mild sleep apnea, or they can happen frequently throughout the night, with moderate to severe sleep apnea.
It is recommended that you get in around 150–300 minutes of moderate or vigorous exercise each week. But you don’t need to drag yourself to the gym to do this. Going for a brisk walk, swimming, dancing, or playing a sport like tennis or basketball can work just as well. In fact, just taking the stairs or walking to the store can improve the amount of physical activity you get. Do remember to start slow and gradually up your activity levels if you’ve not exercised for a while.5

Breathing through your nose. Many people will snore when they breathe through their mouth while asleep.  Converting to breathing through the nose can just require breaking the habit of mouth breathing, but often people cannot make the change because they cannot breathe easily through their nose.  What I recommend is that people think about using an external nasal dilator like a Breathe Right® strip, especially if the sides of their nose (on the outside) collapse when they breathe in through their nose.   If someone has allergies (or even if they do not), they can also try a nasal corticosteroid spray that is now available over-the-counter.  If those do not work, it may be worth seeing a physician (such as an otolaryngologist) to determine why someone cannot breathe easily through their nose, as there are many good treatments available, depending on the cause.


Keep bedroom air free of irritants. The membranes of the throat and soft palate, the tissue at the back of the roof of the mouth, can be irritated by breathing in dust, pollen, dander, and other airborne particles — especially if you have allergies to these things. This irritation can lead to swelling of the throat membranes, narrowing the airway and making snoring more likely. Luckily, eliminating these irritants is usually a simple matter of keeping the bedroom and the bed itself as clean as possible. Here are a few pointers:[10]
A saline nasal wash can be useful in dealing with a blocked nose. Mix in a teaspoon of salt in half a liter of water. Pour this saline solution into your nostril and allow it to run out of the other nostril. Leaning forward with your head tilted sideways while you do this can make the process easier. The saline water will wash off allergens and mucus and leave you breathing easier.8
Experts agree that most people don’t stay still while sleeping, but most also concur that a person’s sleep posture is very important to their ability to stop snoring.  Research shows that laying on the right pillow might be the best way to stop sawing logs, even if you are a back sleeper. Just keep in mind that sleeping on your back causes the throat tissues to relax, which slightly blocks the airway. If you know that snoring is caused by blockages in the airways, it would make sense to sleep with a good pillow while laying on your side.
Snoring occurs when your breath can't flow freely through the passages behind your nose and mouth. Sometimes, it can be "a sign of a much more serious condition called obstructive sleep apnea," Aouad tells MensHealth.com. "OSA is a respiratory disorder that occurs in sleep when the airway narrows or closes, causing oxygen levels in the blood to fall."

“Make sure that you’re able to breathe properly through your nose, since having a stuffy nose will create a slight vacuum effect in your throat, aggravating partial to total collapse of the soft palate and the tongue,” says Steven Park, MD, author of Sleep Interrupted, on his website. It’s possible that the dry air in your room is causing congestion. Try getting a humidifier to open up your airways while you sleep and provide snoring relief. This can be helpful if you think your snoring is due to allergens or a cold.

Dehydration creates a thick mucus in the mouth and throat, which can stick together and cause snoring. The best way to avoid this build up is by drinking enough fluids during the day. The Natural Hydration Council recommends an intake of 2.5 litres of water for men and 2 litres for women per day. They suggest 70-80% should be drunk and the rest should be consumed though foods. Fruit and vegetables are rich in water, so make sure you’re getting your five a day!

10. Get Rid of Allergens Dust your ceiling fans, wash your sheets and blankets, and throw your pillows in the dryer on fluff every few weeks to help rid your bedroom of dust mites, dander, and other airway-aggravating allergens. Another trigger to consider banishing from the bed: pets. Fluffy may be none too happy, but if less pet dander yields silent nights, it may be well worth it.
It’s important to note, however, that snoring could also be an indication of sleep apnea, a potentially life-threatening condition that should receive medical attention. Sleep apnea is typically caused by a breathing obstruction, which awakens the sleeper, at which point the person begins breathing again. Normal snoring usually does not affect the quality of sleep as much as sleep apnea. If you suffer from extreme fatigue, sleepiness and exhaustion during the day, your problem may be more than just snoring, and you should get it checked out by a doctor.
An alternative to a snoring mouth guard is a chinstrap. It consists of a strap that is put around the chin and fastened above the head. This puts the fabric under pressure since it is made from elastic material. The strap prevents the chin from dropping down during sleep, which would otherwise force the mouth to open. Chin straps come with two disadvantages: When you lie on your back, a chin strap is likely to push back your jaw to your throat area and narrow it. This can increase the snoring noise. Second, a chin strap cannot hinder you from breathing through the corners of your mouth (which is a common form of mouth breathing).

Exercises for the throat can be an effective way to reduce or stop snoring. Pronounce repeatedly specifically some vowel sounds can strengthen the muscles of the upper respiratory tract and reduce snoring. Here are 5 recommended exercises on how to stop snoring. Start slowly and gradually increase the number of exercises you do. In some cases, you may be able to combine these exercises with other activities, such as going to work, walking your dog, going to work, or taking a shower.
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Create an environment conducive to sleep. Keep your room dark at night. Sleep specialists note that our circadian rhythms are influenced by light and darkness. This means that many people have a hard time falling asleep when it's still light out, which happens in the summer thanks to daylight savings.[9] At night, shut your blinds and curtains. Turn off bright overhead lights. Consider getting a black out curtain which keeps any light from shining through. If it's still too bright or too much light is getting in, consider wearing a sleep mask.
You probably didn’t need science to tell you this, but “snoring can affect your quality of sleep as well as your bed partner’s,” says Neil Kline, a sleep physician with the American Sleep Association. If you don’t believe us, take a look at this 2006 study, which found evidence of sleep disruption in children and adolescents who snored, or this 1999 one, which found that people slept an entire hour longer each night after their spouses stopped snoring. This is important because we know that good-quality sleep improves your overall health.
It is recommended that you get in around 150–300 minutes of moderate or vigorous exercise each week. But you don’t need to drag yourself to the gym to do this. Going for a brisk walk, swimming, dancing, or playing a sport like tennis or basketball can work just as well. In fact, just taking the stairs or walking to the store can improve the amount of physical activity you get. Do remember to start slow and gradually up your activity levels if you’ve not exercised for a while.5
"For some people, craniosacral therapy can be a good augmentation strategy in the treatment of snoring," says Vora. Craniosacral therapy is an alternative treatment, often used by osteopaths and chiropractors, that utilizes light touch to subtly manipulate joints in the skull and sacrum to relieve tension and improve functioning of the central nervous system. There have been no studies on craniosacral therapy and snoring, but some people think that it may help, in part, by alleviating sinus issues and promoting proper mucus flow.

Try changing sleeping positions. Lying on your back at night causes your tongue and soft palate to collapse back into your airways causing you to snore. If you're having difficulty maintaining sleeping on your side you may want to try the "The Tennis Ball Trick." With this trick you can tape, sew, or use an ace bandage to secure a tennis ball so that it rests against your back. As you roll onto your back while unconscious, the pressure will cause discomfort making you roll back onto your side during the night. Within a few nights, your body may be trained to stay sleeping on your side.
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Just about everyone snores occasionally, and it’s usually not something to worry about. But if you regularly snore at night, it can disrupt the quality of your sleep—leading to daytime fatigue, irritability, and increased health problems. And if your snoring keeps your partner awake, it can create major relationship problems too. Thankfully, sleeping in separate bedrooms isn’t the only remedy for snoring. There are many effective solutions that can help both you and your partner sleep better at night and overcome the relationship problems caused when one person snores.
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